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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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Content

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Recommendations - Surrey Police, January 2017

This investigation is concerned with the decision by Surrey Police to return shotguns and certificate back to a male in July 2013, after they had been seized from him after it was alleged that he threatened to shoot his step daughter. In February 2014, the male shot and killed two people.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
IOPC reference
2014/024553
Date of recommendation
Friday, 13 January, 2017
Date the force response is due
Friday, 10 March, 2017
Recommendations
It is recommended that Surrey Police consider introducing structured training for all staff within the firearms licensing department to enable them to perform their role to the required standard, as set out in their job specification and guidance under APP.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

A training needs analysis has been conducted with every member of staff and a record of training and continuous professional development process for FELU staff has been developed with an emphasis on understanding and using the National Decision Making Model effectively, understanding intelligence and systems and ensuring all available new legislation, policies and new Force practices are disseminated. This process is managed by experienced managers/deputy managers and is aligned to the set criteria of the national firearms licensing course which all firearms enquiry officers have attended during the early stages of their employment in this role. The gap analysis is close to conclusion and in terms of enhancing the professional development programme the delivery date is expected to be during summer 2017.  This is an ongoing process and has been embedded into the revised 1-2-1 sessions that each member of staff now has with their supervisors every month. This process will ensure that any areas of concern can be identified in a timely manner by FELU managers and addressed.

The development process will be underpinned by the aim for all staff to understand the concept of threat, risk, harm, and vulnerable persons. Therefore, the focus of the process will be on the firearm enquiry officers understanding and putting into practice the National Decision Making model (NDM) thereby making sound decisions based on all the available intelligence, the perceived threat/risk, available powers and policies/law together with refreshing investigative skills and knowledge.

All staff within the FELU are in the course of completing NCALT training courses, including refreshers of investigation techniques, government marking and Domestic Abuse training.

All Firearms & Explosives Licensing Unit (FELU) have access to the Surrey Police Crime and Intelligence recording system known as ‘NICHE’ and the training and capability to enter and research intelligence on the system. The Force Intelligence Hubs provide assistance to support the Firearm Enquiry Officers (FEO) Continued Professional Development (CPD) to assist in their confidence to use intelligence systems.

An intelligence and reporting process has been developed for the FELU which will ensure that all available intelligence has been researched prior to any National Decision Model (NDM) based decisions being made by any officer or staff member.

Further areas of business that will be focused upon are changes in regard to legislation and national and Force policy and procedures, will be disseminated to staff either through team meetings, e-mails, 1:1 meetings and training sessions.

Specialist training in specific subjects identified as of importance will be arranged on a need basis. This will be integrated into both CPD and new staff familiarisation training. This is an ongoing piece of work by FELU managers and at this point in time safeguarding presentations will be delivered by experienced detectives to all staff within FELU. These presentations are focused on providing the teams with the ability to identify situations where domestic abuse could be a factor and how to highlight such issues to specialist teams and supervisors within FELU.

Firearms Enquiry Officer job descriptions have been reviewed and meaningful conversations have taken place between staff and supervisors to make clear the expectations of this important role in protecting the public from harm.

It is recommended that Surrey Police ensure that there are robust systems in place to ensure that police officers responsible for investigations related to licence holders highlight any potential concerns or risk about the license holder to the firearms licensing department.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

Processes are now in place to ensure that reported incidents that are received by Surrey Police are subject to a manual National Firearms Licensing Management System (NFLMS). This manual check has been initiated so as to ensure that any addresses that relate to the name or address of a firearm certificate holder are automatically flagged by control room staff and are brought to the attention of attending officers. This holistic approach was expanded to all incidents as previously it was focused on only five types of incidents which included domestic abuse, assaults, and mental health. This expansion of the checking process ensures any risk or threat relating to NFLDS is flagged by the FCR to officers.  All the existing supervisors in the Police Contact Centre and the Police Control Room have been trained in the use of the National Firearms Licensing Database System (NFLMS) to enable them to cascade to their teams how to effectively check the names and addresses that come to adverse notice. All incidents with related addresses that officers are deployed to via controllers are now checked on NFLMS prior to deployment. Initial and refresher firearms licensing awareness training for both contact centre and control room staff has been delivered by the FELU manager, this training includes inputs on types of guns, police national legal database, police powers, seizure procedures and NFLMS. This is ongoing training and continues for both new and experienced staff members. The importance of highlighting these known potential risks through proper channels to the FELU is being rolled out. This has been done by the manager and deputy manager of the FELU by improving the engagement of their department with other investigative and Intelligence departments; the Force Control Room and Contact Centre and with the Police & Crime Commissioner’s office. National good practice is followed for the management of information and the development of intelligence so that any intelligence regarding certificate holders is provenanced and graded. In terms of investigations related to organised crime groups (OCGs) close working relationships have been developed between intelligence units, FELU and investigating teams. This has been evidenced by close working relationship developed by these units as they delivered in Surrey the aims and objectives set by the recent NCA led operation Dragonroot which focused on OCGs and the criminality involved in the supply of once legally held firearms. All officers are informed of the importance of abiding by the Code of Ethics and the National Decision Model in regard to intelligence submissions.

All officers and members of staff have been reminded/informed as to their responsibilities in terms of seizing legally held firearms as a result of an incident and their ongoing responsibilities in terms of submitting intelligence and keeping FELU updated as to investigations involving licensed holders. Firearms enquiry officers have been reminded of their responsibility to research all available intelligence before making their own decision or making recommendations to other delegated decision makers.

Forcewide Message: The criminal use of legally held firearms by a registered firearms holder is very rare but when such an incident does occur the consequences for victims can be catastrophic and have a significant impact upon the organisation. When officers are deployed to an incident in which there are legally held firearms kept on the premises involved then it is crucial that officers consider the suitability of the guns remaining in situ; this assessment should be undertaken even if the guns have played no part in the ongoing incident.  In incidents involving domestic abuse, acts/threats of violence, mental health and self-harm officers will be informed by controllers as to whether legally held firearms are registered to the address to which they are attending; for other types of incidents officers can request if they assess as necessary a firearms check on the address that they are attending. If it is assessed by officers that any legally held firearms should be removed from the premises so as to prevent a breach of peace or that there is a danger to the public safety then their supervisor should be informed and the firearms seized. It is important that the firearms are made safe and that the firearms certificate is also seized at this time. The officers should inform the Force Firearms and Explosives Licensing Unit (FELU) of the seizure and submit a Niche intelligence report with all relevant information as to the incident. If it is assessed by officers that any legally held firearms kept on the premises do not need to be seized consideration should still be made as to informing FELU of the incident.  In the case of seized firearms and any related ongoing criminal investigation it is the responsibility of the OIC to keep FELU updated as to the progress of this investigation. The submission of intelligence is crucial in terms of reoccurring incidents and any decision by the organisation as to whether the legally held firearms are returned to the certificate holder. The Force’s Domestic Abuse policy provides guidance for the seizure of legally held firearms which can be used as an aide memoire for any legally held firearms related incident. If any officer or member of staff has any question with regards to legally held firearms then please contact FELU and a member of the team will be happy to assist.

It is recommended that Surrey Police ensure there are robust systems in place to ensure that staff involved in revocation decisions review sufficient information from criminal investigations to make informed risk assessment and decisions about the return of shotguns and certificates.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

All files and or reports will be referred to an officer of Superintendent rank or above for a decision to return firearms or to make decisions in accordance with guidance contained in the Home Office ‘Guide on Firearms Licensing Law.’ All files and reports will be laid out in a structured and consistent format that encapsulates the principles of the NDM risk assessment. The files/reports will include what checks have been conducted i.e. Police National Computer, Police National Database, and Intelligence Hubs together with copies of any relevant statements, incident reports, officers observations and sufficient information for an informed ‘balance of probability’ decision to be made.

Recent developments in relation to this recommendation include a new Oversight Review template which includes a checklist of requirements, and reference to the Code of Ethics and NDM.

It is recommended that Surrey Police review how evidence of medical conditions, in relation to applications for renewals of licenses and certificates, is obtained and processed, to ensure that they can effectively assess whether all relevant conditions have been disclosed and the impact any conditions have on an applicant’s suitability to possess firearms or shotguns.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

All files and or reports will be referred to an officer of Superintendent rank or above for a decision to return firearms or to make decisions in accordance with guidance contained in the Home Office ‘Guide on Firearms Licensing Law.’ All files and reports will be laid out in a structured and consistent format that encapsulates the principles of the NDM risk assessment. The files/reports will include what checks have been conducted i.e. Police National Computer, Police National Database, and Intelligence Hubs together with copies of any relevant statements, incident reports, officers observations and sufficient information for an informed ‘balance of probability’ decision to be made. Recent developments in relation to this recommendation include a new Oversight Review template which includes a checklist of requirements, and reference to the Code of Ethics and NDM.

It is recommended that Surrey Police ensure that there are effective procedures in place to ensure that staff within the firearms licensing department are aware of how to identify and correctly classify domestic violence incidents.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

The FELU has been working with Specialist Investigation Units (SIU) over the last 10 months to provide an investigation review approach to all cases involving domestic abuse (DA), to review the DA policy and to enhance the knowledge of staff in relation to domestic abuse and linked investigations. Currently the Seizure of Legally Held Firearms policy has been subject to legal advice but has been agreed in principle with all significant internal partners. However, the salient points of this policy have already been integrated into the recently reviewed, revised and approved “Domestic Incidents involving Firearms and/or Firearms Certificate holders’ guidance” document attached to the Force DA Policy.

As indicated the Surrey Police DA policy has been published and officers have been given clear and precise advice as to what to do if they attend an address where there are legally held firearms/shotguns. This policy is owned by SIU but FELU will assist all officers in terms of complying with this new revised guidance. Clear guidance is given in this policy that investigating officers, SIU and FELU should all work together with regards to any response to an incident and any subsequent revocation review.

The DA policy has been promoted and publicised to all staff and is available on the Force intranet. Further reference to the policy and firearms guidance has been made in the current forcewide message focusing on the seizure of legally held firearms.

Below is the new guidance.

Domestic Incidents involving Firearms and/or Firearms Certificate holders.

 When attending a domestic abuse incident, Force Control Room (FCR) are to complete checks, before responding officers attend the premises, to determine if any of the persons present during the incident hold firearms licenses and whether any firearms are on the premises.  This includes both suspect and victim, as the suspect may well be aware of the location of firearms or keys to a firearm cabinet.

For all Domestic Incidents DASH graded High and Medium risk, officers must look to seize and remove all licensed firearms (including shotguns) and any certificates. This is to ensure no preventable harm is caused by the potential misuse of firearms or shotguns. Decisions should be based upon the National Decision Model (NDM) In Standard risk cases, common sense should prevail and if the completion of the DASH provides a standard risk because, for example this is the first recorded incident and/or there are no other factors to consider, the decision not to remove any firearms must be based on the severity of the incident (This is to include any Coercive and Controlling behaviour, not just physical abuse) and the rationale must be clearly documented.

Where the decision is made NOT to seize firearms and certificates then the Duty Inspector MUST be informed and sanction the decision. The safeguarding of victims of domestic abuse is paramount.

Chief Officers expect firearms to be seized when circumstances indicate they should be. Guns can always be returned to the holder where appropriate by the licensing team once the full circumstances of the case are known. If there is any doubt whether to seize a firearm and certificate, the officer at the scene MUST discuss the case with their supervisor or Inspector on duty at the time.

POWER TO SEIZE:

* The certificate holder may be invited by attending officers to voluntarily surrender their firearms, ammunition and certificate pending a review of their continued suitability to be issued with a firearm/shotgun certificate. * Common Law Power – Breach of the Peace:

* Officers have a common law right to seize firearms, ammunition and certificates, if they believe that a danger to the public safety exists.

* If such belief does exist then steps should be taken, at the earliest opportunity, to seize such items. The purpose of seizure of the certificates is to prevent a further purchase of firearms.

* Under common law a constable has the power to enter premises to prevent or deal with a breach of the peace. However, officers must be aware that there are no specific powers of entry or seizure other than this without a warrant.

* If a Breach of the Peace is not occurring and therefore this power is not applicable/relevant in a particular situation and the certificate/firearms are not voluntarily handed to officers, then Police can apply to obtain a warrant under section 46 Firearms Act 1968.  Advice is available from the Firearms Licencing Unit or OPS1 as to how to obtain such a warrant; the process is similar to any other warrant request to Magistrates. Officers must also make a request to the Firearms Licensing Manager or relevant senior operational officer for the certificate(s) to be revoked.

Actions Required

* Officers must always consider danger to public safety or the peace, including arrangements for storage of the firearm/shotgun/ammunition where the certificate holder is a victim of or a witness to domestic violence or abuse in the family home.  * Any household which is in domestic turmoil is unlikely to be a suitable place for firearms to be stored.

* In many cases other family members are aware of the location of any keys to any gun cabinets within the home.

* All firearms seized should be made safe prior to removal from the location and if in any doubt advice or attendance of by Tactical Firearms officers should be sought.

* The guns and certificates should be initially stored at a police station and entered onto the property system.

* Officers must inform the Firearms Licensing Manager that guns and certifications have been seized. This will trigger a review by the Firearms Unit as to the continued suitability, or not, of the certification holder to possess the firearm or shotgun without causing a danger to public safety or to the peace.

* Officers deployed to the incident and those investigating the offences must ensure that the Firearms Licensing Unit are updated as to all information and intelligence relating to the investigation.

* Revocation of firearms certificates are based upon the balance of probability rather than beyond all reasonable doubt, so ALL details are important. * Prior to the conclusion of the review by Firearms Licensing, an input will be sought from the Investigating officers/Safeguarding Investigation Units as to any advice, direction or information that could assist the delegated officer in making the final decision.

* Firearms and certificates will not be returned until a review of the case has been completed and the Head of the Surrey and Sussex Operations Command authorises it.

See also the Firearms licensing section of APP.

See here for the list of 15 HIGH RISK indicators for Domestic Homicide.

It is recommended that Surrey Police review their approach to quality assurance within the firearms licensing department, including whether it is sufficient to pick up any issues and whether it is being performed at an appropriate level.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

Quality assurance is conducted by supervisors within the FELU and by the Chief Inspector and Superintendent responsible for the FELU. In addition a quarterly meeting takes place where the responsible Assistant Chief Constable dip-checks decisions made by the FELU Superintendent. Dip-checks will be completed by an officer of Superintendent rank or higher to check the revocation decisions of FELU managers to introduce another layer of quality assurance scrutiny. Currently Surrey and Sussex dip-check each other’s decisions, and these are recorded for quality control purposes.  The possibility of other Forces, either regionally or nationally, supporting one another in terms of peer reviews has been explored. The inspection lead officer considered the details of possible processes and approached South East Regional Forces to discuss. Overall the resulting feedback did not reveal a desire for cross border dip checks as it was considered that current force procedures were satisfactory.  Further research will be conducted across the UK so as to identify good or best practices in this area of policing, or consider other review processes within other areas of policing that could be used within firearms licensing.

Material provided by Chief Constable shows that a deputy manager has been provided with delegated authority in relation to revocation of shotgun certificates, authorised on 26 March 2015. Since then, APP guidance has been published which states that delegated authorities should be given to senior officers and managers only. It is recommended that Surrey Police review their delegated authorities in line with APP guidance.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

A review of all delegated authorities within Surrey Police has been completed. A new performance framework, governance structure and decision making process (in line with APP guidance) for the unit was also introduced including reviewing the levels of delegated authority. All firearm restoration decisions are now made by a Superintendent or above. When Chief Constable Ephgrave recently  took office a further review was conducted and new delegated authorities were agreed and signed by the new Chief Constable.

It is recommended that Surrey Police ensure that there are processes in place to ensure that complainants who have made an allegation against a certificate holder (which resulted in the seizure of their firearms and certificates) are informed of any decisions made in relation to the return of the shotguns and certificates.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

All complainants who have made an allegation against a certificate holder are notified of decisions made to return firearms provided it is risk assessed and does not increase any threats, risk or potential harm posed.

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