An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.

A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IPCC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter; and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into a complaint and produces a report that details the outcome of each allegation. There are four types of investigation: local investigation, supervised investigation, managed investigation and independent investigation.

Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June

Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September

Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December

Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).

The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
The IPCC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.

Presentation given by Tom Davies at the Working Together to Respect and Protect Conference

Jun 13, 2011

Working Together to Respect and Protect Conference

Introduction

Why are we here today, with the unusual sight of the IPCC and a police force hosting a conference on a high volume crime?

Well summer 2009 was highly unusual! Five women were killed in Wales in July and August – sadly that isn’t unusual, but the five deaths were referred to the IPCC, which made it so.

I want to set out today who the IPCC is, what we do and highlight the key lessons from the investigations we did into those 2009 deaths.

 Before I do though, it would be remiss of me not to mention the tragic deaths in Braintree, Essex last week of Christine Chambers and her two-year old daughter Shania. These two deaths apparently followed contact with the police service and my colleague Commissioner Rachel Cerfontyne has just started an independent investigation.

This latest case follows just six months after the IPCC reported on how Essex Police dealt with Maria Stubbings prior to her murder and we made a number of recommendations.

This is not to prejudge the latest investigation or make assumptions that there were failings in this case or that they were similar. The point I am making for our work - and following this conference - is that our learning and any improvements we make in Wales have to be maintained. We must ensure complacency does not creep in and that the IPCC ends up investigating further police mistakes in dealing with domestic abuse.

You are all experts and I don’t really need to tell you the stats, but I will because if 104 men a year were killed because they are men there would be uproar. statistics tell ussome startling things about domestic violence: 

  • One incident of domestic violence is reported every minute 
  • On average, two women a week are killed by a current or former male partner.
  • In Wales and England in 2008/2009 domestic violence accounted for 14% of all reported violent incidents to the police. 
  • Domestic violence had more repeat victims than any other crime, with repeat victims accounting for 66% of all incidents and 21% of victims having been victimised three or more times
  • In 2007/2008, nearly one million women experience at least one incident of domestic abuse each year.

Welsh Women’s Aid estimate that as many as 150,000 children and young people are affected by domestic abuse in Wales at any one time and it has also been estimated that the cost of dealing with domestic abuse in England and Wales every year is about £5.7bn.

 

What is the IPCC?

 

In this country we are policed by consent. The IPCC is independent from government, complainants and the police service and weplay a small part in assisting that consent. We do that through oversees how the police deal with complaints, as well as handling appeals and investigating allegations of misconduct.

 

As an organisation we have also researched areas of concern, mostly related to areas that have prompted the highest number of deaths involving the police or public concern such as mental health, police pursuits and deaths in custody.

 

Through our investigations and research we provide recommendations for improvements in the police service the public receives.

We have also worked to help move the complaints system from a blame culture that only examined complaints from the view of proving misconduct – that somebody did something wrong and should be disciplined if proven - to one that recognizes the public often only want an apology, recognition something has gone wrong and that it wont happen to someone else.

 

We are now also trying to do more independent investigations by targeting them at specific elements within an incident. This will help provide value for money and reduce the demands made on frontline policing resources.

 

Learning the Lessons Process

 

One of our most important functions involves promoting excellence in policing by drawing out and feeding back learning.  As well as the IPCC, police forces, police authorities, ACPO and policing partners all have a role to play in ensuring that learning is captured, shared and monitored. We have a joint Home Office mechanism to do so.

 

One key way in which we do this is by recommending changes to policing policy and practice in light of investigation findings and things we learn. We then share these recommendations throughout the police service to our local forces.

In addition, for issues deemed to be of national importance the Learning and Confidence Committee is a multi-agency committee that has been established to disseminate and promote learning across the police service. Its members include: 

  • The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO),

  • Association of Police Authorities (APA),

  • Home Office, HM Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) and

  • The National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA). 

The Committee produces a bulletin three times a year with lessons from investigations - this is circulated to police forces and other bodies with constabulary powers.

 

Summer 2009 - Four Independent Investigations Linked To Domestic Abuse

Gender Violence is an IPCC priority area and we have investigated a raft of high-profile cases across Wales and England where women have sought help from the police and have subsequently been killed or seriously injured.

Like you we want to reduce the likelihood of future harm from domestic abuse, stalking and harassment. We want improved confidence of victims and satisfaction with the service they receive.

In the summer of 2009 the four high profile murders were referred to the IPCC. Because the investigations contained the similar theme of domestic abuse  in some form, involved all four forces and happened within a relatively short time frame the decision was made to link the work we were doing to see if there were particular themes emerging.

You really won’t be surprised to hear that there were no startling revelations. In truth the learning was mundane, but showed the importance of establishing a consistent approach within police forces at individual and management levels.

[THE FOLLOWING SECTION IS SUPPORTED BY A SLIDE HIGHLIGHTING THE LEARNING FROM EACH OF THE FOR CASES. KEY AREAS CAN BE SUMMARISED AS:

CALL HANDLING

TRAINING

INFORMATION SHARING

CALL ROUTING

OVERSIGHT SYSTEMS SUCH AS MARAC]

 

Conclusion and Going Forward

 

We found in looking at those Welsh cases that much good work has been done in Wales:

  • Domestic homicide reviews that everyone now has to do were started in Wales;
  • Welsh Assembly Government –‘The Right to be Safe’ six-year integrated strategy for tackling all forms of violence against women;
  • Home Office Call to end violence against women and girls: action plan launched in March 2011.

I do not need to tell you that Domestic Abuse is a high-volume crime that puts pressure on police resources there is always another pressure. Be it youth crime, sex offenders or work culture

 And let us not forget domestic abuse is the fault of the perpetrator but we must avoid complacency – there seems to be a cycle of great zeal and campaigns and then the foot comes off the gas.

We have to ensure that out of terrible events we have learned the requisite lessons and improved the system. Learning is only effective if it leads to real change in culture and practices: So we need to ensure that we:

  • Share information better information so we build a complete picture through procedures such as the DASH process
  • Share good practice through events like today
  • Drive improvements in service forward – ACPO lead CC Napier and Learning Lessons.

 

The IPCC has been rightly criticised in the past for not rigorously ensuring that when we make recommendations they are followed-up so they are put into operation. As part of today though each of the forces involved in those 2009 cases will set out today how they have implemented the learning recommendations in their force areas. 

Aside from learning for the forces we have established official links with the Public Services Ombudsman of Wales, The Children’s Commissioner for Wales and the Wales NAO. This will allow information to be passed quickly in cases with similar themes where other agencies are involved so the actions of health and social services agencies to be scrutinised along with the police.

We also looked at the support given to the four Welsh police forces because gender violence is a Wales Government priority as well - the Right to Be Safe Strategy.  Wales Government delivered a budget of some £5 million in 2010 on domestic abuse

Some of this money was used for training and publicity campaigns. Government - whether Whitehall or the Welsh assembly - and the police service periodically run anti-domestic abuse campaigns, particularly before rugby internationals and the football season.

But it is important that the impetus of those campaigns is maintained by all agencies, including the police as it would be a tragedy if we enter a cycle of lots of activity followed by complacency where people do not do the mundane but vital work. That would result in having to re-visit all of this again in a couple of years time.

Success at this conference will be the IPCC not having to investigate domestic violence cases because there are not any to refer.

 

Success in Wales will look like your good practice and excellence being followed by others in England.

Domestic abuse is not just the responsibility of the police to deal with and this conference will let us all, be we from government, police or the third sector, to share best practice so we can work better together to improve how domestic abuse services are delivered.

 

TOM DAVIES

IPCC Commissioner for Wales

NOTES TO EDITORS:

For more information please contact David Nicholson IPCC Press Office on 0292025464.

Follow the conference online using @ipccnews or hashtag #daconfwales on Twitter.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.

A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IPCC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter; and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into a complaint and produces a report that details the outcome of each allegation. There are four types of investigation: local investigation, supervised investigation, managed investigation and independent investigation.

Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June

Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September

Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December

Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).

The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
The IPCC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.

Police force:

Location: