An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.

A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IPCC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter; and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into a complaint and produces a report that details the outcome of each allegation. There are four types of investigation: local investigation, supervised investigation, managed investigation and independent investigation.

Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June

Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September

Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December

Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).

The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
The IPCC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.

IPCC investigation finds organisational failings with Gwent Police

May 18, 2009

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has concluded that Gwent Police failed to adequately manage registered sex offender Malcolm Hewitt and also found organisational failings within the force’s management of sexual offenders.

Hewitt was found guilty at Newport Crown Court in August 2007 for sexually assaulting a four-year-old girl.

The IPCC investigation has upheld the complaint that Gwent Police failed to take appropriate action to manage the movement and conduct of a registered sex offender, endangering the welfare of the children living there.

IPCC Commissioner for Wales Tom Davies said: "Gwent Police’s policies and procedures for dealing with the management of sex offenders at that time were clearly not good enough and the force took action to put this right.

“The IPCC investigation outcomes and the positive actions Gwent Police has taken in response have been explained to the girl’s family by the IPCC. This little girl has suffered a traumatic experience and I hope that the family take some comfort that lessons have been learned from this to try and stop something similar going wrong in the future.

“While the IPCC found that two junior officers had failed in their specific duty, we concluded those failings were a symptom of more serious organisational failures which led to the overall poor management of this registered sex offender.

“Gwent Police has fully accepted the IPCC investigation findings and conclusions. I have also agreed with the force that while two police constables would receive management advice, no other individual officer should face misconduct action because of the organisational failings.

“The IPCC welcomes the wide-ranging and positive response from Gwent Police. This details the work the force has undertaken to enact the recommendations for police forces in Wales arising from the review of the Craig Sweeney case.

”The IPCC has also discussed these matters with Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and they have since inspected Gwent Police following the changes made by the force and have found the new policy and procedures acceptable.”

- ENDS -

Notes for editors

The statement given at a press conference today by IPCC Commissioner for Wales Tom Davies follows at the end of this news release.

Background

• April 2002: Hewitt moved to the Gwent Police area and registered his new home address in a caravan as a registered sex offender. He lived at this address for five years;

• April 2007: four-year-old girl discloses sexual abuse to her mother;

• May 2007: Gwent Police refer the matter to the IPCC;

• August 2007: Hewitt found guilty by a jury at Newport Crown Court of two charges of indecently touching a child and one charge of inciting a child under 13 to engage in sexual activity;

• November 2007: a complaint against Gwent Police was made by the child’s mother, who alleged that the force failed to take appropriate action upon discovering that a Registered Sex Offender was residing at the address, thereby endangering the welfare of the children living there.

Investigation findings

The levels of performance of two police constables were found to be below that expected. These two officers will receive management advice.

The complaint against Gwent Police is substantiated for the following reasons:

• Failing to take action in relation to Hewitt’s foreign travel breaching his registration;

• Failing to make subsequent visits within recognised timescales;

• The officers failed to notify their superviser of Hewitt’s failure to comply with his registration requirements;

• Although the two officers did not know that there were children living where Hewitt’s caravan was located, sections of the force were aware;

• Hewitt was not managed in line with legislation or force policy;

• No record of any supervisory involvement or review of Hewitt during the five year management of him;

• The documented policy ‘Gwent Police and Gwent Probation Services Procedure for Management of Potentially Dangerous Offenders/Registered Sex Offenders’ appears to have been completed after August 2001, but does not appear to have been ratified by the force. Also, it does not appear to have been updated to take account of national MAPPA guidance issued in March 2003.

• There were a number of officers who were not aware of this policy document, which raises questions about how it was disseminated;

• Some officers in interview during the investigation accepted that sex offender management was an area which required more attention than they could give it.

Recommendations and action taken

Many of the issues raised as a result of this investigation were highlighted to the force following a review of the management of Craig Sweeney which was conducted by officers from Dyfed-Powys Police and presented to the force in November 2006.

The review made 20 recommendations and all of these have now been implemented.

In addition to these changes the force Strategic Risk Assessment Group identified Public Protection as an area of risk for the force which would benefit from a Service Improvement Review and as a result a review commenced in April 2007.

The review made 36 recommendations, some of which directly affected the management of Registered Sex Offenders.

The Service Improvement Review was conducted in parallel with collaboration work that was ongoing between the four police forces in Wales and benchmarking work done by the All Wales Review found Gwent to be out of line with other forces. This was because although policies and procedures were in accordance with guidance and representation was given to the meetings, the ability to influence Basic Command Units or to provide any central audit function was limited.

This was also highlighted by the HMIC inspection who commented:

“The Force does not undertake periodic Thematic Audit and Review of Public Protection work to test compliance and consistency of quality of service delivery, as well as health checks on staffing levels and workloads. Such audits, undertaken by the central strategic team, would provide Chief Officers with a regular overview, independent of Divisional Commanders’ advice”  

It is this lack of connection between the Strategic Oversight and the Operational Delivery that had caused many of the difficulties highlighted in this investigation.

This lack of connection has now been rectified. The dedicated detective superintendent post was created in January 2008 and the post holder is supported by a detective chief inspector, a detective inspector and a new post of review manager.

A full performance framework is nearing completion and public protection is now discussed at all ACPO performance visits to divisions. The force is also now in a position to collect and review all performance data required by the new MAPPA guidance and this is monitored in force and through the Performance and Standards Group of the Strategic Management Board.

Training of PPU staff is now co-ordinated from the centre and the force training budget has set aside dedicated funds for the MAPPA SMB to deliver joint training and has recognised that seminars are an integral part of training in this field. Development seminars have been held for all PPU staff and included a full briefing and workshop concentrated on the implications of the new MAPPA guidance.

Joint training has been provided for all MAPPA chairs, all officers have attended the Management of Sex Offenders Course, Risk Matrix 2000 and VISOR training. In addition all officers have been allocated the Child Exploitation Online Protection (CEOP) Seminar entitled ‘Management of Sex Offenders in the Community.’

Workloads were examined by the review in line with a baseline figure derived from draft national guidance and consultation with other forces. It was found that workloads in ‘A’ and ‘B’ Divisions were at an acceptable level whereas in ‘C’ Division they were higher than the baseline; however, the figures for the Force as a whole equate to the baseline figure.

The review team was specifically tasked to look at options for providing dedicated supervision. Within the current structures dedicated first-line supervision could only be achieved across the Force by creating a minimum of three additional detective sergeant posts, however if structures were moved to central control, this may be resolved within current supervisory levels. The proposed management levels would not only correct the imbalance of offender to officer, but also, by providing higher levels of resilience, permit joint visits and a greater ability for conducting pro-active tactics.

The review was presented to the Police Authority in November 2007 and all 36 recommendations were accepted, although full implementation was suspended pending the force Staying Ahead Project reporting. However, strategic capacity at the centre was increased, allowing some of the recommendations to be progressed.

Following the issues regarding Hewitt coming to light an immediate, review of all Registered Sex Offenders was commissioned. A template for visits was created, including specific questions regarding their access to children and every RSO was visited.

Gwent is now a pilot area for the Stable and Acute Risk Assessment and all practitioners have been trained which, in addition to the template, has provided officers with much greater skill in recognising and assessing risk when visiting and reviewing offenders.

The Violent and Sex Offenders Register (ViSOR) is being fully utilised around the force and work is ongoing to utilise the new Guardian 2 computer system to flag addresses and nominals.

For further information please contact:

Regional Communications Officer David Nicholson on 02920 245464/07717 851 223. For urgent out-of-hours enquiries would journalists please call the IPCC duty press officer on 07717 851 157.

 

PUBLIC STATEMENT BY IPCC COMMISSIONER FOR WALES TOM DAVIES

IN SEPTEMBER 2007 REGISTERED SEX OFFENDER MALCOLM HEWITT WAS JAILED FOR SEXUALLY ASSAULTING A FOUR-YEAR-OLD GIRL AND WAS SENTENCED TO AN INDETERMINATE SENTENCE AT NEWPORT CROWN COURT.

THIS WAS AN ABHORRENT CRIME AND MUST BE EVERY PARENTS NIGHTMARE AND OUR THOUGHTS AND HEARTS GO OUT TO THE CHILD AND HER FAMILY.

THIS WAS HEWITT’S CRIME AND HE MUST TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE EVIL HE DID THAT CHILD AND HER FAMILY.

THE KEY FACTS OF THE CASE ARE AS FOLLOWS:

  • HEWITT MOVED TO THE GWENT POLICE AREA IN 2002 AND AS A REGISTERED SEX OFFENDER REPORTS HIS NEW ADDRESS.
  • AT THE TIME THE POLICE START MANAGING HEWITT AND CONDUCT A RISK ASSESSMENT THEY DO NOT BELIEVE ANY CHILDREN LIVE AT THE ADDRESS.
  • HEWITT IS LIVING IN A CARAVAN ADJACENT TO THE GIRL’S FAMILY HOME.
  • AS A REGISTERED SEX OFFENDER HE IS NOW SUBJECT TO MANAGEMENT BY GWENT POLICE.
  • HEWITT’S ABUSE OF THE LITTLE GIRL EMERGES IN APRIL 2007 AND MUM INFORMS THE POLICE.
  • GWENT POLICE REFER THE MATTER TO THE IPCC ON 17 MAY 2007.
  • JUNE 2007:  I AND THE IPCC INVESTIGATOR WENT TO MEET THE FAMILY AND EXPLAIN OUR ROLE.
  • IN AUGUST 2007 THE COURT FINDS HEWITT GUILTY AND HE IS SENTENCED ON 11 SEPTEMBER.
  • THE CHILD’S MUM COMPLAINS TO THE IPCC ON 20 NOVEMBER 2007

IPCC INVESTIGATION

WHEN THE FORCE REFERRED THIS CASE TO THE IPCC I DECIDED WE WOULD MANAGE AN INVESTIGATION CARRIED OUT UNDER OUR DIRECTION AND CONTROL BY GWENT POLICE.

THIS WAS BECAUSE OF THE LIVE CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION INTO HEWITT AT THAT TIME WHICH MEANT IT RIGHTLY HAD TO TAKE PRIORITY.

FOLLOWING THE COURT CASE AND HEWITT’S SENTENCING THE CHILD’S MOTHER LODGED A COMPLAINT WITH GWENT POLICE:

I QUOTE

“SHE ALLEGED THAT THE FORCE FAILED TO TAKE APPROPRIATE ACTION UPON DISCOVERING THAT A REGISTERED SEX OFFENDER WAS RESIDING AT THE ADDRESS, THEREBY ENDANGERING THE WELFARE OF THE CHILDREN LIVING THERE.”

THE IPCC INVESTIGATION HAS BEEN VERY THOROUGH AND SUBSTANTIATED THE COMPLAINT.

I SET THE TERMS OF REFERENCE TO LOOK AT HOW OFFICERS CARRIED OUT THEIR DUTIES MANAGING HEWITT AS A REGISTERED SEX OFFENDER AND THE FORCE’S POLICIES, PROCEDURES, TRAINING AND RESOURCES ALLOCATED.

THE INVESTIGATION ALSO CONSIDERED WHETHER THE MATTERS UNDER INVESTIGATION SHOULD BE JUDGED AS CRIMINAL OR MISCONDUCT.

THE INVESTIGATION CARRIED OUT BY GWENT UNDER MY MANAGEMENT WAS RIGOROUS AND DOES NOT PULL ANY PUNCHES IN ITS CRITICISM OF THE SYSTEMS AND POLICIES IN PLACE IN THE FORCE AT THAT TIME.

GWENT POLICE FAILED TO PROPERLY MANAGE HEWITT AS A REGISTERED SEX OFFENDER AND NOT ONLY DID IT PUT THE CHILDREN LIVING AT THE ADDRESS AT RISK IT MEANT THIS YOUNG CHILD SUFFERED SEXUAL ABUSE.

THIS WAS A SYSTEMIC ORGANISATIONAL FAILURE BECAUSE THE SYSTEMS IN PLACE WITHIN GWENT POLICE WERE NOT FIT FOR PURPOSE.

I TURN NOW TO THE ACTIONS OF THE POLICE OFFICERS CONCERNED:

THE POLICE HAVE A COLOSSAL RESPONSIBILITY ON OUR BEHALF AND THEIR DECISIONS AND ACTIONS ARE RIGHTLY SUBJECT TO SCRUTINY.

THE TWO OFFICERS WHO WERE GIVEN THE TASK OF MANAGING THIS SEX OFFENDER HAD TO DO SO WITHIN THE SYSTEM IN PLACE AT THAT TIME. THESE OFFICERS WERE STRUGGLING WITH THEIR WORKLOAD AND PRIORITISED SEX OFFENDERS WHO WERE CATEGORISED AS A GREATER RISK.

THE PRIORITY AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT THESE OFFICERS WAS POOR AND THEY CLEARLY FELT STRECTHED AND UNABLE TO PROPERLY FULFILL THEIR DUTIES.

THE KNOWLEDGE THAT THERE WERE CHILDREN AT THIS LOCATION WAS KNOWN WITHIN GWENT POLICE BUT WAS NOT AVAILABLE TO THE OFFICERS MANAGING HEWITT.

THE IPCC FOUND IN THE CRAIG SWEENEY CASE IN SOUTH WALES THAT THE COMPUTER SYSTEM KNOWN AS ViSOR WAS DEFICIENT IN HOW INFORMATION WAS SHARED. THIS HAS NOW BEEN PUT RIGHT, BUT NOT AT THAT TIME.

OUR INVESTIGATION FOUND THESE SYSTEMS WERE SIMPLY NOT GOOD ENOUGH AND THE OFFICERS HAD TO MANAGE WITH:

  • INADEQUATE SUPERV
  • ISION
  • CONFUSED POLICIES
  • RELEVANT INFORMATION HELD WITHIN THE FORCE WAS NOT SHARED – FOR EXAMPLE, ONCE THERE WERE CHILDREN AT THIS ADDRESS THAT INFORMATION WASN’T ADEQUATELY SHARED
  • LACK OF ADEQUATE RESOURCING
  • SENIOR MANAGERS WERE NOT GIVING PUBLIC PROTECTION ISSUES PROPER OVERSIGHT AND RESOURCES

THESE SYSTEMIC FAILURES BY GWENT POLICE ARE WHY WE SAY THAT THE ORGANISATION HAS FAILED AND NOT THE OFFICERS INVOLVED IN MANAGING HEWITT.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

IT IS VITAL THAT THE PEOPLE OF GWENT CAN HAVE EVERY CONFIDENCE IN THEIR POLICE FORCE.

GWENT POLICE HAVE ALREADY RIGOROUSLY IMPLEMENTED A RAFT OF RECOMMENDATIONS AND THESE ARE DETAILED IN THE NEWS RELEASE IN YOUR PACKS.

I WELCOME THE WIDE-RANGING AND POSITIVE RESPONSE FROM GWENT POLICE TO THE LESSONS LEARNED FROM THIS INCIDENT AND THE VARIOUS REVIEWS AND RECOMMENDATIONS MADE AS A RESULT OF THE MANAGEMENT OF THE CRAIG SWEENEY AFFAIR AND GWENT POLICE’S OWN INTERNAL REVIEWS.

HER MAJESTY’S INSPECTORATE OF CONSTABULARY HAS SINCE INSPECTED GWENT POLICE AND HAS FOUND THE NEW POLICY AND PROCEDURES ACCEPTABLE.

IN WALES AND SOUTH WEST WE FOLLOW-UP INVESTIGATION RECOMMENDATIONS AND AT MY REGULAR MEETINGS WITH EACH WELSH POLICE FORCE THESE ARE ON THE AGENDA SO THAT WE CAN LOOK AT PROGRESS.

THE PUBLIC PROTECTION ISSUES AND LEARNING FROM BOTH THIS AND THE CASE INVOLVING CHILD A AND CRAIG SWEENEY HAVE BEEN TAKEN FORWARD WITH THE WELSH POLICE FORCES BY IPCC INVESTIGATORS.

THE SENIOR IPCC INVESTIGATOR WHO OVERSAW THIS INVESTIGATION IS WITH THE GIRL’S PARENTS TODAY TO TAKE THEM THROUGH THE INVESTIGATION FINDINGS.  

I HOPE THE LITTLE GIRL’S FAMILY CAN TAKE SOME COMFORT THAT LESSONS HAVE BEEN LEARNED FROM THIS TO TRY AND STOP SOMETHING SIMILAR GOING WRONG IN THE FUTURE.

IT IS NOW RIGHT THAT BOTH THE CHILD AND HER FAMILY CAN BE LEFT IN PEACE TO CONTINUE THE MONUMENTAL TASK OF HELPING PUT HER LIFE TOGETHER WITH WHATEVER SUPPORT IS NECESSARY.

I WOULD ALSO REMIND THE MEDIA THAT THE IDENTITY OF THE CHILD AND HER FAMILY MUST NOT BE PUBLISHED. THAT FAMILY HAS SUFFERED ENOUGH.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.

A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IPCC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter; and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into a complaint and produces a report that details the outcome of each allegation. There are four types of investigation: local investigation, supervised investigation, managed investigation and independent investigation.

Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June

Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September

Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December

Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).

The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
The IPCC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.

Investigations:

Police force:

Location: