An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.

A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IPCC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter; and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into a complaint and produces a report that details the outcome of each allegation. There are four types of investigation: local investigation, supervised investigation, managed investigation and independent investigation.

Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June

Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September

Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December

Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).

The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
The IPCC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.

IPCC concludes investigation into the death of an 87-year-old Polish man

Dec 3, 2009

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has concluded its investigation into the circumstances leading up to the death of Hipolit Konrad Legowski in Devon after mistakenly driving there from Telford, Shropshire, and found that the police could have done more to help him.

A custody sergeant was found to have failed to have been conscientious and diligent in the performance of his duties with regard to Mr Legowski’s detention at the police station and has received words of advice.

Two civilian control staff failed to comply with force policy and inadequately supervised a control member of staff in not ensuring a police unit was deployed to a report of a concern for welfare.

The sergeant who took Mr Legowski into detention was also found to have fallen below required standards of duty. A third civilian control room member of staff was also found to have fallen below acceptable standards of duty in failing to properly record the registration of Mr Legowski’s car.

Mr Legowski was 87-years-old and had got lost driving near his home in Shifnal, near Telford, Shropshire, on 27 July and found himself in Devon. His body was eventually discovered near his car on land near Hartland, Bideford on 30 July 2008.

Due to his erratic driving police officers spoke to Mr Legowski and because of concerns for his welfare he had been detained under Section 136 of the Mental Health Act and taken to Barnstaple Police Station at 1am on 28 July.

He was assessed by a doctor who found that he had no mental health issues that could justify his continued detention and the police therefore had no formal powers to detain Mr Legowski any further. However, the doctor did advise that Mr Legowski had early-stage dementia.

Mr Legowski was eventually sent on his way home to Shropshire at 2.45am on 28 July.

At 4.48pm on 30 July the police call centre received a call from a farm in Hartland Bideford, Devon, reporting a car as abandoned for over 24 hours. Mr Legowski’s body was found in a field nearby.

The cause of death was deemed to be from natural causes and therefore an Inquest was not held.  

IPCC Commissioner for the South West Rebecca Marsh said: I would like to again offer my condolences to Mr Legowski’s family who suffered the loss of a loved one in particularly upsetting circumstances.

The investigation found a number of basic mistakes were made by officers and civilian members of staff and these have now been acted on by the police force.

Mr Legowski was an elderly gentleman who was clearly lost and confused about where he was.

The police officers dealing with Mr Legowski when they first spoke to him called an ambulance but were advised that there was nothing medically wrong with him. They were concerned for his welfare and explored many options to help him.

The officers decided to take him to the police station under powers under Section 136 of the Mental Health Act. I have nothing but praise for the efforts these three officers made to help Mr Legowski.

Once Mr Legowski was in the police station and had been medically examined the investigation found that more should have been made to assist him to get home safely. Further attempts to get a social worker to attend may have helped, and basic enquiries would we believe have identified Mr Legowski’s family.

Other agencies and healthcare professionals did not assist either and I have written to them following this investigation.

There were also basic mistakes made by other officers and staff within the force. For example, failing to properly record the registration number which meant the vehicle was not immediately linked to the earlier log of a missing person.

Also, the scene where Mr Legowski’s body was found was not properly managed and searched which led to further anxiety for his family who felt that someone else may have been there when he died because his car keys could not be found.

Mr Legowski’s family eventually found the keys themselves at the scene some three weeks later.

This highlights an issue of organisational learning with regard to scene management and professional attention to detail when searching, bearing in mind this could have been a crime scene.”

The IPCC investigation was carried out by officers from Devon and Cornwall Constabulary’s professional standards department under the management of an IPCC investigator.

- ENDS -

Notes for editors

INVESTIGATION SUMMARY

87-year-old Mr Legowski, of Polish origin, had first come to the notice of the police on 27 July 2008 following a 999 call reporting a suspected drink driver and providing the vehicle’s registration number.

Two officers were dispatched to the area and arrived at 10.26pm. After 16 minutes they advised the control room they had not seen the vehicle and resumed their patrol. The log was closed at 10.43pm.

At 11.51pm on 27 July the police received a call from an off-duty police constable saying he was following a vehicle, which appeared to be all over the road. He requested the assistance of a marked police vehicle.

Two police officers attended and checks were made to see whether Mr Legowski had been reported as a missing person. The officer said she suspected Mr Legowski had been driving for a considerable time and he might be dehydrated or suffering a condition which might have prevented him continuing on his journey.

The officers called an ambulance and discussed their options regarding what they could do. They contacted their sergeant for advice and he decided to attend as well. The ambulance crew assessed Mr Legowski as physically fit and did not require hospital admission.

The officers remained concerned for Mr Legowski’s welfare and so a decision was taken to detain him under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983. Mr Legowski was taken to Barnstaple Police Station, arriving at approximately 1am on 28 July 2008.

The officers checked Mr Legowski’s wallet for any contact numbers or names and found one piece of paper with the name ‘LEGOWSKI’ and a phone number written on it. The police tried the number but got no response.

The custody sergeant decided to get the duty police surgeon to attend and make a Mental Health Act assessment. The doctor said Mr Legowski had early dementia (forgetfulness) most likely due to his age.

He stated that in his opinion Mr Legowski did not warrant being detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act. He stated that despite this he attempted to contact the out-of-hours Approved Social Worker (ASW) but nobody was available to take his call so he left an answerphone message detailing the circumstances and condition of Mr Legowski.

The doctor stated to the investigation that he advised the officers to escort Mr Legowski home as he felt he would get lost if left alone. He states the sergeant told him it would not be easy to arrange an escort for Mr Legowski and recalls the sergeant saying: If Mr Legowski’s address was in Exeter or Plymouth I would escort him.”

The doctor then states there was a discussion between the two sergeants about contacting Shropshire Police in order to arrange to meet halfway between Barnstaple and Shropshire with Mr Legowski.

The two sergeants had also tried unsuccessfully to contact the local out-of-hours social services and social services in Shropshire.

The two sergeants discussed what options they had available to deal with Mr Legowski and said they agreed they had no power to continue to detain him.

The police attempted to persuade Mr Legowski to book into a local hotel for the night but he continued to maintain he was only 30 minutes from home. The police returned Mr Legowski to his vehicle and directed him to the M5 motorway and let him go on his way.

Having returned Mr Legowski to his vehicle they followed him onto the A39 towards Tiverton and the M5. The officers last saw Mr Legowski at approximately 2.45am, 28 July.

At 7.14am, 28 July 2008 the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary police call centre were contacted by a service station employee who reported that an elderly male had come into the filling station, and appeared confused and claiming to have been driving all night from Wolverhampton and was lost.

The service station employee said he was concerned about the male being on the road.

The Police Call Centre staff who logged the call checked the PNC and linked the vehicle with the two previous calls regarding Mr Legowski. The radio operator handling the call flagged the log for closure as they were ‘aware of the male – he can go on his way”. The radio supervisor formally closed the log at 7.34am.

At 6.04pm on 29 July 2008 Mr Legowski was reported as a missing person to West Mercia Constabulary, who created an incident log. An early risk assessment was made and information gathered into the circumstances of Mr Legowski’s disappearance.

It was established Mr Legowski had last been seen by one of his granddaughters on 27 July when she had spotted him in his car during the afternoon driving in the direction of Wolverhampton.

Mr Legowski did not have a mobile phone. There were no known physical illness, disability or mental health problems and as a result he was identified as vulnerable due to his age and the fact his disappearance was out of character and was designated as a ‘medium’ risk missing person.

At 6.31pm an officer was sent to check Mr Legowski’s home address with a member of the family in order to confirm he had not returned home and to obtain sufficient information to formally record him as a missing person. A post code check conducted on the PNC at 7.15pm identified the registration number for the vehicle and an action was raised for the vehicle to be flagged on the Police National Computer and circulated.

Subsequent enquiries conducted on the police computer by West Mercia at 8.20pm revealed that Devon and Cornwall Constabulary officers had recently conducted checks on Mr Legowski’s vehicle. Contact was immediately made with the control room at Devon and Cornwall Constabulary to establish the circumstances of these checks.

There appears to have been some confusion between the two forces with West Mercia recording that Mr Legowski had been sectioned under the Mental Health Act. There then followed a number of enquiries where staff were clearly attempting to establish exactly the whereabouts of Mr Legowski. Unfortunately at 8.45am the log shows that Mr Legowski’s family were informed he had been located.

When it became clear Mr Legowski had not in fact been sectioned and his whereabouts were unknown an entry on the log timed at 10.09pm states: The elder sister I spoke to has stated that he obviously has the onset of dementia but it has not been diagnosed. She has taken him to the doctors but Mr Legowski declined to be referred on for scans etc.”

This is the first mention that Mr Legowski may have had early signs of dementia and as a result a West Mercia inspector directed the risk assessment for Mr Legowski to be reviewed and his status be upgraded to that of a ‘High Risk’ missing person.

Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) cameras were unsuccessfully checked between Devon and Cornwall Constabulary and West Mercia to establish whether Mr Legowski’s vehicle could be identified.

At 4.48pm on 30 July the Devon & Cornwall Constabulary Police call centre received a call from a farm in Hartland Bideford, Devon reporting a Ford Fiesta motor vehicle as abandoned on a footpath on land leading to the beach and it had been there for over 24 hours.

The tape of this call into the Police Call Centre has been reviewed and it has been established the call handler incorrectly recorded the registration number.  

A Police National Computer check on the vehicle details recorded by the call centre revealed no trace and as a result was not immediately linked to the missing person enquiry for Mr Legowski.

At 6.37pm it was recorded that this vehicle may be linked to the missing person report. As a direct consequence of this police officers were sent to the farm and discovered Mr Legowski’s body in a field near his abandoned vehicle.

Mr Legowski’s car keys could not be found at the scene and this caused his family some concern as it raised questions as to whether there was someone else involved in his death. As a result of these concerns local officers made a further unsuccessful search for the missing keys.

Eventually, Mr Legowski’s family visited the scene where his body was located and found his car keys by the fence which he would have had to have climbed over to gain access to the field where his body was located.

The post-mortem found that death was by natural causes.

INVESTIGATION RECOMMENDATIONS

These have all been acted upon.

The investigation considered what provision currently exists within Devon, Cornwall and Plymouth Primary Health Care Trusts (HCT) for designated places of safety to be made immediately available for persons detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983. As a result of previous IPCC recommendations the Force have given notice to the three HCT that as of 1 April 2009 any person detained by Police under the Mental Health Act will be taken in the first instance, unless violent or under the influence of alcohol or drugs, to a place of safety identified and staffed by the HCT.

We understand that there is still some reluctance in the HCT to embrace this change in working practices and would therefore recommend that consideration be given to a letter being sent by the IPCC to the chief executives of the Health Care Trusts voicing support for this.

With regard to Force learning it is recommended that consideration be given to joint Mental Health Act training between all partner organisations involved in the provision of care in these circumstances.

With regard to the training of officers in respect to scene preservation and management it is recommended that particular emphasis is given to instructing officers in the need to ensure that all scenes are professionally maintained with attention given to detail in all cases, even where the first initial scene assessment has indicated that there appear to be no suspicious circumstances. It must be at the forefront of every officer’s mind that any death potentially could be suspicious. This is particularly important in cases of suicide or sudden unexplained deaths.

All officers subject to this particular case to be provided with a copy of the full investigation report.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.

A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.

A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IPCC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IPCC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IPCC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IPCC.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.

The appropriate authority can be:

  • the chief officer of the police force
  • the Police and Crime Commissioner responsible for the police force you complained about
  • the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service)
  • the Common Council for the City of London (if your complaint is about the Commissioner of the City of London police).
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
A person is adversely affected is he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
IPCC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved through non-disciplinary action. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.

A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
Consists of a chair, two deputy chairs, and commissioners – each responsible for specific police forces, guardianship work and individual cases.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IPCC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter; and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into a complaint and produces a report that details the outcome of each allegation. There are four types of investigation: local investigation, supervised investigation, managed investigation and independent investigation.

Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June

Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September

Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December

Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).

The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
The IPCC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.
An application by a complainant for a police decision to be reviewed.

Police force:

Location: